Tag Archives: 930 club

on my boom box: feed me (with teeth), BBC essential mix

4 Jan

New year, same blog. Sometimes consistency is a wonderful thing, isn’t it?

Even though it’s been awhile since my last post, I’m sort of pleased that my last post related to Basslights. I just got back a few days ago, and gawd what I wouldn’t give to go back. I’ll spare you a review, but suffice to say it was ah-mazing: Griz, Big G, Gramatik, A-Trak, Pretty Lights, and Bassnectar all killed it. Just when I think I’m ready to stop spending mad money seeing these artists over and over again, I realize it’s always worth it, every single penny.

A big part of the fun of going to out of town shows is the road trip- really, what’s a better excuse for clowning around with your friends in a new place for a few days? Traveling for shows is like the fun version of traveling for work- no distractions, just pure focus on the task at hand. But instead of work, your task is: have as much damn fun as possible.

I always have great compadres for these trips, most of whom are way more in the know about music than me. This weekend was no exception; and, sure enough, during a long, traffic-filled drive home, our road trip jams turned me on to a dope, new-to-me DJ: Feed Me.

Feed Me is the house/dubstep/moombahton project of John Gooch, a DJ from Hertfordshire who is also known as Spor. He has released a ton of music between his two projects over the past few years, the most recent of which has been on mau5trap, Deadmau5’s record label. But for me, the particular hook was his BBC Essential Mix. Picture this: I am hungover, running on zero sleep, sitting in bumper to bumper traffic on 95, and should probably be hating life. Instead, I’m head bopping and perking up at the sounds of Robyn into Radiohead dubstep remixes. If something could perk me up in that state, it’s damn good.

As DC’s luck would have it, Feed Me is coming to the 930 Club this month, albeit on a Sunday. But for the dedicated bassheads, this is one not to miss. Think about it.

In the meantime, please listen to this BBC Essential Mix in its entirety. You now have something to look forward to in your work day tomorrow!

BBC Radio 1 Essential Mix ft. Feed Me

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two bars three stars: upcoming DC shows

20 Aug

Rainy Sundays can be so ideal for people who enjoy music and writing, because staying indoors is the ideal environment to enjoy both of those pursuits. This blog, like the American agriculture industry, could benefit from a little more rain this summer.

So, let’s catch up, shall we? There have been a flurry of ticket purchases recently, and I’d like to bring your attention to all of them.

1. Thursday, August 23: Nighttime Adventure Society with Mike & Cody at Rock n Roll Hotel (local music alert)

I’ve blogged about both of these bands’ shows recently, so if you haven’t seen either of em yet, then you’re in luck! They’re playing again this week at RnR. The show will act as a nice lead-up to NAS’ debut album release in a few weeks. It’ll be on sale for only $7, so check them out and cop that ish when it drops on September 4.

Nighttime Adventure Society, “Past Life”

2. Sunday, September 30: St. Vincent and David Byrne at the Strathmore

David Byrne is an especially gratifying musician to admire, because not only has he been a musical pioneer for decades, but he also chooses excellent, exciting musicians for collaborations. Remember when he remixed Zola Jesus? Incredible. Now, he’s teaming with guitar goddess (and object of my extreme affection) St. Vincent for the ultimate genre-blurring, line-pushing, too-much-talent-fueled duo album, Love this Giant. The first single off of said upcoming album, “Who,” was featured on RwR’s July playlist, and I still cant stop listening to it as we near September- the horns, the funky grooves, St. Vincent’s voice with David Byrne’s crazy beats… amazing. The second single, “Weekend in the Dust,” has only added to my intense excitement for what will undoubtedly be a highlight of my fall show schedule- and perhaps unlike any show I’ve seen before. I mean forreal, can one stage really hold all of that talent? It might just collapse under their metaphoric weight.

St. Vincent and David Byrne, “Weekend in the Dust”

3. Friday, October 3 – Sunday, October 5: Sweet Tea Pumpkin Pie Music Festival (lots o’ local music alert)

Back again and bigger than ever, STTPFest will take over various clubs, restaurants, and cafes all over the city and infuse them with live, local music for all of Columbus Day weekend. For those who have visited Austin for South by Southwest, the set-up is similar: live music takeover. If this fest has it’s way, you wont be able to avoid running into a plethora of local and visiting acts performing at your favorite places in Adam’s Morgan, U Street, and Cleveland Park.

4. Thursday, October 25: Major Lazer at 930 Club

I blogged about this guy recently as well, when I hyped one of his proteges (Brazilian club bangers Bonde do Role). But here’s a bit more background: Major Lazer was formerly a collaboration between mega-producer/DJ Diplo (the mastermind behind much of M.I.A.’s music) and DJ Switch, though now Major Lazer is solely a Diplo project. Major Lazer encompasses Diplo’s interest in fusing Jamaican dancehall beats with more traditional electro house. With thumping reggaeton beats, the familiar uhn-tiss of house, and some smashing guest vocals from Santigold, Amanda Blanks, and Nina Sky, the result is nothing short of boombastic. Major Lazer is the musical equivalent of the party that’s so intense and outrageous that you’re not even sure if you should be there, but eventually you just embrace it and have a buck-wild good time. Hence, the 930 Club will be one hot sweaty mess come October 25.

Major Lazer ft. M.I.A. and Busy Signal, “Sound of Siren”

5. Friday, December 7: Japandroids at Black Cat

Somehow, back in June, I failed to notice when Japandroids made their first DC appearance following their incredible spring release, Celebration Rock. I have no idea what caused that dire inattentiveness to show calendars, but suffice to say I was disappointed. I’ve been listening to Celebration Rock with ever-increasing frequency since April, and it truly is a gem. These guys are noisy in all the right ways, but not abrasive or obnoxious. The lyrics are simple and relatable, and their music makes me feel like these guys are just my good buddies, singing songs about the house party we went to last weekend. DC, how lucky are we that these guys are coming back in just a few short months, at one of the city’s most perfect venues?! Snipe your tickets now, they won’t last long.

Japandroids, ‘Fire’s Highway”

i was there: M83 at 930 club, early show

14 May

Wow, three weeks without a post? How did that happen?! Oh, I know: I went to Europe for two weeks. And, as anyone who travels knows, the week following a 15-day trip pretty much requires exhaustive effort just to get out of bed in the morning and deal with the fact that you’re not traveling. Sigh.

BUT! I am back in action. Specifically back in show action, with the long-awaited M83 double show at the 930 Club this past week. While I had tickets to both instances of the double-header, I decided to share the wealth and sell the tickets to a friend.

Those of you who went probably recall that this show wasn’t originally listed as a two-parter. Back in February, 930 Club announced the show and it sold out instantly (as in, less than 5 minutes instantly). Those of us who scored tickets felt beyond victorious- our time spent glued to Ticketfly and hitting refresh had paid off!

But our gloating was short-lived. A few weeks later, the show time was moved up and a late show was added. All of the sudden, “the show” was now “the early show.” I don’t think I was alone in feeling a little perturbed by this move. The tickets were pricey, and having an early and late show implies that each one will be at best short and at worst incomplete. So, while I was obviously stoked for this musical experience that was months in the making, it felt a little strange arriving at the 930 Club when it was still light outside for an event that was supposed to be the highlight of my show season.

Nonetheless, I went in with a positive attitude and was antsy to see if the band would live up to my friends’ raves about their Coachella set. And ultimately, the show met all of my expectations. Yes, the sound/energy/song choices were awesome; yes, it was too early and too short.

Given the structure and content of M83’s albums, at least their two most recent ones (Hurry Up We’re Dreaming and Saturdays = Youth), I was less concerned about the actual song choices, but more concerned about their order and how they fit and flowed together. More so than almost any band I listen to regularly, I refuse to listen to an M83 album out of order. The songs are strong, but the album is really a mosaic; the beauty is in the holistic experience. If you listened to their tunes as singles, many of them simply wouldn’t make sense. You wouldn’t get why a voice track of a little girl talking about frogs is awesome and not random (“Raconte-Moi Une Histoire,” sadly not played).

With that criteria in mind, I think the actual performance was spectacular. The band played a wide spectrum of songs, ticked off most of the hits (except no “Kim and Jessie” whaaaat?), but- most importantly- it flowed really well, even though the songs obviously didn’t follow album order.

I was also pleasantly surprised at the number of musicians on stage with Anthony Gonzales, M83’s only permanent member. The bevy of artists and instruments on stage obviously made for a richer, fuller sound without the need to rely on loops, and many of the band members straight multiplied the amount of energy on stage- I was grateful for their presence and their head banging throughout.

Other specific song highlights include “New Map,” the anthemic “Midnight City” (obviously brought the house down), and the encore, which made the previously lackluster crowd finally get on board and move their feet.

But, of course, it ended far too soon. I’m looking forward to reading about the late show and figuring out if the experience would have been any better had I stayed for the late show, but really I feel I shouldn’t have been faced with that choice. On the bright side, though, it was quite nice leaving the 930 Club with essentially a whole Saturday night ahead of you. I could get used to that.

 

i was there: sleigh bells at the 930 club, 3.28.12

29 Mar

Not wearing earplugs last night was a supremely poor life decision.

Sleigh Bells. The loudest band around. The only one that can make bang your head, shake your groove thing,  pump your fist, and cover your ears in pain/pleasure, all in a 49-minute sprint of a show.

Tuesday was my third time seeing the Bells, but the first since they released their second album Reign of Terror. My expectations for a Sleigh Bells show are always incredibly high, but I always come away with the same conclusion: so damn good. Too damn short.

These whippity quick sets were easier to justify when the Bells had only released one album- they somehow toured for over two years on just 32 minutes of recorded material(!!!). Now with two albums under their belt, I expected more longevity during this tour. But, true to form, the Bells stormed the stage for 49 minutes that passed in a snap. However, given the bone-crushing energy that the New York duo pour into each and every song they perform, I can forgive it.

The biggest thing that struck me about the Bells’ performance on Tuesday is just how much they have, despite their best efforts to hide it, matured. Sure, bad ass frontwoman Alexis Krauss still howls like a werewolf at opportune moments. Also, for the first half of the show, I thought she was wearing sunglasses- nope, just layers upon layers of dark eye makeup. The basic formula of the Bells’ show remains the same: they thrash and scream and the audience moshes and it’s a big sweaty mess. But now, it feels a bit more professional.

Most importantly, the Sleigh Bells I saw on Tuesday convinced me that I actually like their new album. When I first listened, I was intrigued by the direction they took with their softer tunes like “Crush” and “Leader of the Pack.” But the album as a whole felt a little disjointed, and I wasn’t confident it would work live.

Fortunately, I was wrong. The Bells have fine-tuned their craft and know exactly how to weave the hard and fast with dance-y and soft and everything in between. They commanded that show like expert puppet masters who understood what each song would do to the audience. They brought us up and down and threw us all around, but the entire show felt perfectly balanced. They seamlessly wove all of their disparate sounds into a very cohesive show that displayed the best of everything Sleigh Bells does well.

Third time was a charm, but here’s hoping the fourth and fifth times are just as swell.

Sleigh Bells, from Reign of Terror